How To Avoid Being A Light Sleeper

I have always been plagued by the problem that I am a naturally light sleeper. The littlest things can stir me from my sleep, and this is only made worse by the fact that once I am woken up, I am pretty much too awake to fall back asleep once the noise dies down - if that even happens at all.

Recently, I found myself jolted awake hours before my alarm was set to go off by some random noise outside of my apartment building and my window. This was the third time in one week that I had been roused from my sleep for pretty much no reason, only to lie in bed wide awake for an hour or two before managing to kind of get a little more rest before the alarm inevitably went off. As I stared up at my ceiling once more, I decided that enough was enough - I needed my sleep, and I needed to find out what I could do to get plenty of it, despite the fact that I am a light sleeper by nature

I did some digging around until I came across a very insightful and helpful article post on the matter by Everyday Health, and I would be happy to share what I learned from the post here with you, considering the fact that the information helped me so much. Here is what you should know about getting to sleep throughout the night as a light sleeper.

The most important thing to consider and to be aware of is whether your current sleeping environment is already contributing to making you a light sleeper or not. For example, if you live right in the heart of a big city and you are exposed to a lot of lights, this may mess with your circadian rhythms enough to make getting deep sleep a difficult task to accomplish. If you think this may be your issue, try investing in blackout curtains, or sleep with an eye mask to see if this brings you relief. 

You will also want to remove all electronic devices from your bedroom if you can. At the very least, turn them all completely off in the hour before bed. That is because the blue light coming from the electronic devices can also keep your body as well as your brain from producing melatonin, the hormone in the body that is necessary for producing restful sleep.

Used under Creative Commons Licensing courtesy of osseous