Healthy Communication: Body-Mind-Chiropractic

Most of us are aware of the fact that our bodies are highly complex and intricate. But what you might not be as aware of is that the body relies on communication with itself and with us to identify and fix problems. What does this mean? It means that when we have an issue, say a herniated disc in the spine, the body identifies the issue and communicates the information to the brain. The brain evaluates the information, and tells us there is a problem – and pain is its way of saying so. Pain is how our bodies communicate that something is out of whack. Knowing this, we should make a more conscious effort to address pain instead of masking over it or brushing it off.

Taking Notes

Sufferers of chronic pain have the potential to fall into a place where they no longer realize they are hurting. They get so used to the pain that it becomes part of the norm, and goes largely unnoticed. This is detrimental to health, because by (subconsciously) ignoring the pain, the problem persists, and gets even worse. For people who don’t experience chronic pain, it is important to take notes on baseline health, and look into anything that is out of the ordinary. Knowing your body helps you recognize when it is doing what it should, and more importantly, it helps you recognize when something is wrong.

Chiropractic and Wellness

Chiropractic works under the concept that spinal alignment affects every part of the body. When the spine is out of line, it can pinch nerves or put pressure on nerves, impeding nervous flow and function and causing miscommunication that leads to pain. When you get to that stage of the game, chiropractic adjustment is necessary and beneficial. Chiropractors treat the cause of pain instead of just covering over it with pain medication or temporary fixes. And as a part of your regular health and wellness regimen, chiropractic can help prevent problems before they start.

 

*Disclaimer: Always consult your physician or other health care professional before seeking treatment or taking related advice herein.*

Story Credit: Check Engine Light: What your body may be saying By Dr. Amy Spoelstra