Health: 6 Winter Myths

Its winter and that brings cold weather and flu-like symptoms. There are many health concerns that people experience during the cold winter months.

But do you know if there is truth to them or just a common myth?

Read more to find out 6 common winter health myths.

You shouldn’t work out in the winter

It has been shown in studies that exercising in the winter time actually burns more calories in less amount of time. This in turn helps raise endorphins levels higher than if you were working out in warmer temperatures.

No such thing as winter allergies

For those that struggle with seasonal allergies during the spring and summer months, you may think that you are in the clear during the cold winter months.

But if you find yourself sneezing and stuffed up during the winter months, these symptoms may in fact be from allergies and not the common cold.

The combination of closed windows, less activity outside and the air quality, the winter months can be sometimes harsher because of the lack of air movement.

Not necessary to wear sunscreen

This may be a very vital and important misconception to take note of.

Although we may not have an abundance of sunny days throughout the winter season, the strength of the sun is a different story.

The sun is closer to the earth's surface in the winter time, than in the summer, causing its rays to be much more harmful.

Because of this, it is important to wear sunscreen year-round, even in the winter to protect your skin from dangerous sun rays.

You only lose body heat from your head

Although there was a study done in the 1950’s about heat releasing only from your head, recent times have shown this to not exactly be true.

The reality is, whichever body part is less covered while out in cold elements, will result in loss of heat from that area. That can include: hands, feet and the head.

Vitamin C Prevents Colds

Although it cannot completely cure yourself or avoid the common cold, vitamin C is vital in keeping a healthy immune system.

Allowing the daily allowance of vitamin C in your diet (75mg) can help boost your immune system and is possible to help shorten a cold and it's symptoms.

Drinking alcohol warms up the body

You may have thought that you were warming up while drinking a glass of wine, but the reality is that alcohol doesn't make you warm.

So what's that warming effect?

Alcohol rushes your blood to the surface of your skin, but away from your organs. So although it may feel like you are warm, in reality it is the exact opposite.

Also, alcohol inhibits the ability for your body to show symptoms of being cold (like shivering).

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