Stroller and Carrier ER Injuries Raise Questions

By Sandy Schroeder

I was surprised to read that two children per hour go to the emergency room for stroller or carrier injuries, according to Scientific American.

Strollers and carriers are basic when you have small children, and most of us have used them for years without incident. They go everywhere with us, as we move ourselves and our kids about.

High Accident Rates

But Reuters Health says between 1990 and 2010,  360,000 children went to ER for injuries that happened in strollers or carriers. That adds up to 17,000 injuries a year, 50 children a day or 2 injuries per hour.

If you are a parent of a young child, you may be surprised to hear this. Looking further, we might learn more about what is happening and how to keep our children safer.

Study author Kristin Roberts said, researchers used data on injuries among children 5 years old, or younger, who were recorded in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 1990 to 2010.

Accident Specifics

Overall, the study said accidents were most likely to happen among young males under a year old. Head and faces were most frequently involved.  In the carrier injuries coming into ER, 48 percent of the children had soft-tissue injuries, and around 35 percent had traumatic brain injuries or concussions.

Around 40 percent of the stroller accidents were soft-tissue injuries like bruising, followed by traumatic brain injuries and concussions in 25 percent of the cases.

Two percent of the children in stroller accidents, and 7 percent from carrier incidents were hospitalized. The majority of the hospital stays were for concussions or traumatic brain injuries.

Safety Precaution Checklist

  • Make sure the equipment that you purchase is safety rated and do the homework to find the ones rated at the highest levels.
  • Make sure children are buckled in and completely secured each time they are in the stroller or carrier.
  • Never leave the stroller or carrier standing where a toddler might be tempted to climb in or out.
  • Be careful where you put the stroller or carrier, making sure surfaces are level, and it can’t tip or topple over.
  • Never load up the stroller with extra items like purses or shopping bags.
  • Treat the stroller or carrier as carefully as you do when you travel with children in the car. Read the instructions when you buy equipment and do a complete check before using it.  

Spotlighting this problem could save a child from a serious injury. Spread the word among your friends, and be aware of the potential for accidents.

 

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