4 Ways to Deal With Chronic Pain at Work

Do you sit behind a desk all day? If you suffer from rheumatoid arthritis or other types of chronic pain, you may think that achy back and neck, the numb fingers, or the stiff knees just come with the job and there’s not much to do about it. Fortunately, no matter what your job is, there are some simple steps you can take to decrease or eliminate chronic pain while you’re at work even if your job’s a pain in the neck.

  1. Wear the Right Shoes: Don’t sacrifice your body for the sake of fashion. Your feet are responsible for a lot more than you may realize and putting them in the wrong shoes is just going to make their job harder. Your feet are the foundation of your skeletal system. They ensure that your ankles, knees, hips, back, neck and spine are all supported and aligned. So, in essence, the cushier you keep your feet, the more comfortable the rest of you will feel. Wear shoes that don’t constrict your feet, have a soft sole and have heels that are no more than 2 inches high.
  2. Adjust Your Work: If you experience too much pain at work, there’s no way you can do your job to the best of your potential. Learn to delegate and ask for help on tasks that might be difficult for you, like heavy lifting. Find ways to reduce the amount of standing or walking time, if that causes you pain. Look into work-at-home options since that can oftentimes offer you a more comfortable environment.
  3. Ask for What You Need: If you have an employer who is understanding of your condition, open the lines of communication and find out job options that let you play to your strengths and minimize the pain. If your employer is less than helpful, there are organizations in place that can step in and ensure your needs get met in the workplace.
  4. Be Flexible: Because your health is the most important tool in your life toolbox, you may have to make unexpected sacrifices. You may even have to choose a different career. Just remember that one of the best ways to love what you do is to feel good while you do it. Many careers like teaching or waiting tables involve a lot of time on your feet and an inflexibility of schedule that may make it difficult for you to take care of yourself as well as you should.


Always consult your chiropractor or primary care physician for all your health related advice.

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