Exploring Common Dieting Myths

By Stepy Kamei

Dieting is a common experience quite a few people can relate to. People who are trying to lose weight to better their overall health tend to start up a diet, but the same can be said for anyone who just wants to start eating healthier, or who wants to cut out or introduce certain food items for any number of reasons. Fad diets come and go, but the most beneficial tips and tricks to use have remained in conversations about dieting for decades, and for good reason. Meanwhile, there are also plenty of myths and misconceptions out there which can throw people off track in terms of creating a better diet for themselves. There are several key habits that many studies have shown tend to increase a person's success rate when implemented into their dietary plan. 

Skipping Meals: A Definite Don't

This is especially true for breakfast! If you're trying to lose weight, it may seem to make sense that eating less would help with this goal. In reality, eating less can only serve to deprive your body of nutrients, which in turn causes you to overeat later. People who skip breakfast tend to experience increased stress and anxiety during the day, which often leads to stress eating. Furthermore, when the body must go for long stretches of time without any food, blood sugar levels can plummet to potentially dangerous levels. At best, you'll feel cranky and lethargic all day. Worst case scenario, you'll be more susceptible to developing long-term health conditions such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and even diabetes. 

Fat Can Be Good for You

It's simple yet sometimes hard to believe: Not all fat is bad. There's a common misconception that a succesful diet is one which cuts out as much fat as possible from every meal. The body actually needs a small amount of fat in order to derive energy for movement and brain function, among other things. The key thing to remember is to get your fats from healthy food sources. The fat found in chips and fast food is not going to do your body any favors. However, foods such as avocados, whole grains, fatty fish, and nuts and nut butters are all great sources of healthy fat (and carbs!)

An Ideal Plate

A healthy, well-balanced meal should contain about a fistful of lean protein, one cup of fresh veggies or produce, and some form of whole grains. Essentially, if you can break up your plate into thirds using these food types, you've probably got a great meal on your hands which can lead to a healthier diet overall.