Why Raspberries Rule

By Sandy Schroeder

Berries are an easy choice. They taste great and are proven to be healthy. So blueberries, strawberries and raspberries often make it into our shopping carts and onto our tables.

But now, new research is singling out raspberries as a superfood that we may want to know a lot more about.

According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, one cup of raspberries contains 64 calories, 1.5 grams of protein, 0.8 grams of fat, and 9 grams of fiber. Known for their rich color and sweet juicy taste, raspberries are an excellent source of Vitamin C, and are often called “nature’s candy.”

Cardio and Diabetes Fighters

Past research indicated raspberries may be a brain food. But new research from several key groups, shows a range of benefits in the areas of cardiovascular, diabetes, osteoporosis, and inflammation in the body.  

Research from the San Diego 2016 Experimental Biology Conference just posted six different research studies with results indicating red raspberries may fight  inflammation, and help the heart and liver maintain healthy glucose levels. Results also indicate raspberries may help cut the risk of heart failure, which is a key factor for many people over 65.

New diabetes findings in The FASEB Journal show a raspberry diet reduced signs of heart disease, and reduced cardiac fibrosis, which is a thickening of the heart, that often has serious consequences for elderly, obese patients.

Oregon State University researchers studied raspberries too, finding their impact on fatty liver disease were as effective as cholesterol lowering drugs.

Finally, nutrition researchers from Texas Woman’s University found raspberries to be strong fighters of osteoporosis. They believe antioxidant rich raspberries may be an effective tool to maintain bone health.

Ways to Enjoy Raspberries

When you want to add raspberries to your meals, you have a lot of delicious choices. Start with baking, blending them into brownie or biscuit mixes, and then consider making a raspberry tart or special pie.

Make them a treat for breakfast, topping a bowl of oats or a favorite cold cereal. Or blend them into smoothies. Pack them along as quick snacks during the day, or mix them with yogurt for an afternoon break.

Don’t forget to make jam. There are many easy freezer recipes that go together quickly, helping to use up extra raspberries, and extend the season.

Finally, if you have a family birthday coming up, consider splurging with a raspberry topped cheesecake made with low fat crème cheese. It's a luscious way to enjoy such a healthy food.

 


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