How Workaholics May be Ruining Their Health - 4th Week

By Genevieve Cunningham

The life of a workaholic is serious business. Even if it seems like they’re clocked out, their brains are probably still filled with work. Those who are addicted to work tend to spend hours and hours at the office, and then come home and spend hours and hours working on something else. It’s the real deal. While being a workaholic can sometimes be a good thing (more money, good work ethic, great experience), it may also be damaging to their health. If you fall into the group of people who can’t seem to say no to more work, take a look at these reasons to take a little break.

Disease is More Likely

A recent article in US News stated that men who worked 60 hours a week were over twice as likely to develop a form of arthritis. If you’re a woman, the statistics are even worse. Women who worked more than the fair share were at a higher risk for heart disease, cancer, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis. While you may be making more money in the short-term, it seems as though your doctor bills may cancel it out in the long run.

Less Sleep

So much healing and recuperating goes on during the sleeping hours. If you’re working overtime, you’re probably not getting enough shut-eye. This means a higher risk for disease, a suppressed immune system, aches and pains, headaches, and difficulty concentrating. It can also lead to a whole host of other negative side effects which can only be corrected by getting more quality sleep on a consistent basis.

Higher Stress Levels

You might feel like working overtime actually decreases stress. After all, the more you get accomplished, the less you have to worry about. Right? Not so fast. Don’t forget that many of your responsibilities have absolutely nothing to do with work. And when you spend hours and hours on the clock, your other roles in life suffer, which then lead to much higher stress levels and much lower levels of overall health.

If you’re a workaholic, it’s time to reevaluate your priorities. Work can be beneficial to your life, but it can also be dangerous if not treated in a respectful manner. While it will take some restraint, perseverance, and a change in habits, you can learn to balance work and life. And if you do, you’ll likely boost your health and experience an increase in your quality of life like you’ve never seen.

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