3 Work-Break Workouts That Give You Quite The Stretch

If you spend tons of time plopped down in front of your computer screen, did you know that doing so could ruin your posture, inflict all kinds of harm to your back, and lead to inhibited breathing? Fortunately, there’s a simple solution, as most people these days should be stretching to counter the tightness and tension that comes from so-much sitting.

Check out three anywhere-anytime stretches you can do during a break at work that can help you fight the effects caused by slumping in a chair-shaped posture. 

Hip Flexor Stretch With Overhead Reach

• Set your body up in a lunging position by placing your left foot forward and your right knee on the floor. In the process, make sure both knees are bent at a 90-degree angle. Next, extend your left arm over your head. Maintain your torso in an upright position and your hips and shoulders square as you step your left foot forward about 12 inches (keep your right knee on the floor).

• Push your hips forward and down until you feel a deep stretch in your right hip. Keep this position for 30 seconds and repeat on the other side.

Doorway Chest Stretch

• Bend your left arm 90 degrees and set your forearm up against a door frame. Stand with your right foot in front of your left. Next, rotate your chest to your left until you can sense a nice stretch in your chest and the front of your shoulder.

• Keep this position for 30 seconds. Get your other side by switching your arms and legs and repeat for a total of three reps on each side. 

Wall Calf Stretch

• Stand approximately two feet in front of a wall with your right foot in front of your left. Put your hands on the wall and lean into it. Next, shift your weight to your back foot until you feel a comfortable stretch in your calf.

• Maintain this stretch for a total of 30 seconds on each side for a full set and repeat the process until you’ve completed three of them. Try to use this routine every day at least once, or even up to three times daily if you feel especially tight.


Always consult your chiropractor or primary care physician for all your health related advice.

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