Wnhy You Should Keep Your Pork Intake Low to Reduce Health Risks

Known as “the other white meat,” pork is often looked to as an alternative to beef or chicken. While beef is linked to poor cardiovascular health, and there are concerns regarding chicken and the way that chicken is processed, many people turn to pork. Pork comes in the form of ham, bacon, pork loin, and so many other types of food that the pig is a source of sustenance in so many households.

While it is commonly consumed across the world and in some cases looked to as a delicacy, there are numerous health concerns that are associated with pork. While pork is high in fat and can contribute to poor cardiovascular health in similar fashion as beef, there are an additional level of concern involved in pork consumption.

This concern is rooted in the high presence of pathogens found in pork. If pork is not prepared well enough and cooked in the correct manner, there is a high likelihood for these pathogens to work their way into the digestive tract and cause significant damage throughout the body. In addition to these pathogens, it is common for drugs and antibiotics to be found in the tissues of hogs that are going to be used for meat, which is extremely dangerous in the long run.

The most frequently found pathogen in pork meat is a strain of bacteria called Yersinia enterocolitica. This pathogen was found in 69% of raw pork samples that were tested in a round of testing conducted by Consumer Reports. The bacteria has the ability to cause damage to the digestive tract and spread infection. This results in fever, gastrointestinal distress, vomiting, and many other symptoms.

In addition to the pathogens found in raw pork, the same sample test found a drug called ractopamine in 20% of the samples. This drug is banned in 160 countries as it has immense cancer-causing properties and is one of the most dangerous food additives out there.

If you are trying ti incorporate more protein into your diet, there are surely other ways to do so. Rather than choosing pork, try chicken or the elimination of animal proteins altogether. There is plenty of protein in grains and vegetables and with the right education you can make the best decisions for your body.

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Used under Creative Commons Licensing courtesy of Håkan Dahlström