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Your Guide to Ancient Grains

By Sara Butler

Whole grains are an important part of a healthy diet, but most people don’t get enough. Refined grains are everywhere, and since they’re stripped of most of the things such as fiber that make grains so good for you, they should be avoided. If you’re sick of quinoa, a popular whole grain at the moment, and want to expand your whole grain knowledge, then here are a few whole grains you should get to know better.

Farro

Farro is a great grain to add to your diet. It has a nutty taste and chewy texture that make it a great addition to salads or roasted vegetables. Farro also happens to be high in fiber, making it very filling too. It’s an excellent source of iron and magnesium in your diet as well. So, try a little farro and see what you think!

Bulgur

Bulgur is a summer grain that is very chewy and light. It’s high in minerals such as magnesium, manganese, and iron. It’s also relatively low in calories but quite filling, with just 150 calories per serving. Use it at breakfast, lunch, or dinner to create new dishes the whole family can enjoy.

Sorghum

Never heard of sorghum before? Well, it’s mostly used as a grain in animal feed or to manufacture biodegradable packaging, but it’s gaining momentum in the food community again. It’s gluten-free and high in a phytochemical called policosanol, which can help to lower cholesterol levels. You can mostly find it as flour to be used for gluten-free baking, but you can also find the grain in many places.

Wheat Berries

You are probably familiar with wheat berries in their ground form since it’s the cornerstone of whole wheat flour. But the intact grain is really good for you. It has a chewy and nutty flavor and is stout enough to be used in soups, stews, and salads. It’s a complete grain, so it has a lot of fiber to fill you up.

Teff

If you’re ever eating at an Ethiopian restaurant, then you’ve likely had this ancient grain. It’s used to make Ethiopian sourdough bread. It’s also high in calcium and iron while managing to be gluten-free.

Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain high in protein but low in gluten. It’s used to stabilize baked goods without using wheat, so you can find spelt bread, bagels, noodles, and tortillas if you know where to look. It’s high in copper and phosphorus too.

Ancient grains have been nourishing people for centuries. Add them to your diet for variety and to keep you healthy!

To learn more about your health and wellness, see your local chiropractor at The Joint Chiropractic in Greenwood Village, Colo.

 

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